All posts tagged: Eric McHenry

Theodore Roethke Prize 2010

Eric McHenry is the recipient of the Theodore Roethke Prize for poems appearing in the Fall & Winter 2010-2011 (v5.n2) issue of Poetry Northwest.  Read one of the prize-winning poems,“Deathbed Confession,” below, introduced by the author. The Theodore Roethke Prize is awarded to recognize the best work published in Poetry Northwest each year. There is no application process; only poems published in the magazine are eligible for consideration.  To read the work of last year’s recipient, visit here.  For a list of past winners, visit here. The man who called himself Dan Cooper — and who came to be known, through a journalist’s error, as D.B. Cooper — probably didn’t survive his jump from the plane. (There was a time when investigators believed that only an expert parachutist would have attempted such a dangerous jump. Now most believe that only an idiot would have.) But if he did survive, I promise you this: nothing infuriates him more than reading about someone’s recently deceased husband or father who with his last breath confessed to being the …

Eric McHenry: from “The Lovelier As They Fall”

Last week, we featured the first of three takes by Eric McHenry on Robert Frost’s immortal “Nothing Gold Can Stay.”  This week, we bring you the second of these riffs.  The third appears as “Stay” in the Fall/Winter 2010-11 issue (v5.n2) of Poetry Northwest. The Lovelier As They Fall (2) Summer’s last green is gold. The sycamore catches cold and, with a silent sneeze, infects the other trees. Colors like doctors go from house to house, as though something gold could say might keep the cold away. — Eric McHenry’s first book of poems, Potscrubber Lullabies (Waywiser Press), received the Kate Tufts Discovery Award in 2007. His poems have appeared in The New Republic, Common Knowledge, Seattle Review, The Guardian (U.K.) and Slate. He teaches creative writing at Washburn University.

Eric McHenry: from “The Lovelier As They Fall”

The Fall/Winter issue (v5.n2) of Poetry Northwest is beginning to arrive now in mailboxes everywhere; and with it–in the northern hemisphere, at least–the longer nights and falling leaves of autumn.  To mark both of these arrivals, we bring you, this week and next, two riffs by Eric McHenry on Robert Frost’s “Nothing Gold Can Stay.”  A third appears as “Stay” in the current issue of the magazine. The Lovelier As They Fall (1) Fall’s first gold is green. The leaves give up their sheen for texture and a tinge. Their edges curl and singe. Then, like a book of matches, the whole crown kindles, catches, and glows against the lawn. So day goes down to dawn. — Eric McHenry’s first book of poems, Potscrubber Lullabies (Waywiser Press), received the Kate Tufts Discovery Award in 2007. His poems have appeared in The New Republic, Common Knowledge, Seattle Review, The Guardian (U.K.) and Slate. He teaches creative writing at Washburn University. Next: more from Eric McHenry’s “The Lovelier As They Fall”